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SURVIVOR RESOURCES

Click the term below to go directly to that topic.

Stalking

On-Demand Videos

On-Demand Viewing ButtonThe Threat Is Inside The House

Friends and family ask for assistance installing WiFi or configuring smart devices in the house. They are now asking for help ‘fixing my situation.’

The very same Internet of Things (IoT) which are installed for convenience can form a gilded, velvet-lined cage with an Alexa or Siri voice.

We will discuss how the community can apply information security (InfoSec) principles and scientific (forensic) principles to assist domestic abuse victims in cutting the electronic cord to their abuser. The counterintelligence mindset should be applied to the domestic situation- what can be gathered, what sources and methods can be used against a person in their own house, and how to detect the threat.

The talk will discuss the use of social media to detect physical surveillance, technical countermeasures for surveillance devices, lessons learned with forensics…and the ways to protect oneself against leaving data behind.

Operation Safe Escape: Training & Resources

Operation: SafeEscape Logo

We fight against domestic violence in three ways. First is by empowering the individuals impacted by domestic violence, helping them (and their children) turn from victims to survivors. We help to develop secure communication channels with their support system and local shelters, and then build on that to provide security and safety guidance relevant to their current step in the process.

Next, we make sure that the survivor has a safe place to go. To do this, we work with shelters, safe houses, support systems, social services, and advocacy groups in developing security solutions and training staff on counter-surveillance, physical security, cybersecurity, and other security concepts. The goal is to make sure all heroes fighting against domestic violence are safe.

Finally, we work with law enforcement to help provide resources and address any training gaps related to the technical aspects of abuse, stalking, harassment, and other crimes. We work with officers all over the country to help them understand the challenges that victims of domestic violence (and increasingly often, human trafficking) face even after the abuser has been removed from the home. We’re in the process of capturing some of these lessons learned in a formal training program.

Naturally, everything we do is free. We don’t charge individuals–not even shipping costs when we send them resources and tools. We don’t charge organizations for when we help them improve their security posture or stand up a formal program. We don’t charge departments or agencies for consulting and training. We only have one goal: to make sure everyone can feel safe.

Find out more at https://safeescape.org/

Personal Data Removal How-To's

The Smart Girl's Guide to Privacy book cover“The Smart Girl’s Guide to Privacy: Practical Tips For Staying Safe Online” by Violet Blue

The whirlwind of social media, online dating, and smartphones can make life a dream—or a nightmare. For every trustworthy website, there are countless jerks, bullies, and scam artists who would harvest your personal information for their own purposes. But you can fight back, right now.

In The Smart Girl’s Guide to Privacy, award-winning author and investigative journalist Violet Blue shows you how women are targeted online and how to keep yourself safe. Blue’s practical, user-friendly advice will show you how to:

•Delete personal content from websites
•Use website and browser privacy controls effectively
•Recover from and prevent identity theft
•Figure out where the law protects you—and where it doesn’t
•Set up safe online profiles
•Remove yourself from people finder websites

Even if your privacy has already been compromised, don’t panic. It’s not too late to take control. Let The Smart Girl’s Guide to Privacy help you cut through the confusion and start protecting your online life. Find a book seller here – https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25644910-the-smart-girl-s-guide-to-privacy

 

Extreme Privacy Book Cover“Extreme Privacy: What It Takes To Disappear” (3rd Edition) by Michael Bazzell

Michael Bazzell has helped hundreds of celebrities, billionaires, and everyday citizens disappear completely from public view. He is now known in Hollywood as the guy that “fixes” things. His previous books about privacy were mostly REACTIVE and he focused on ways to hide information, clean up an online presence, and sanitize public records to avoid unwanted exposure. This 565-page textbook is PROACTIVE. It is about starting over. It is the complete guide that he would give to any new client in an extreme situation. It leaves nothing out and provides explicit details of every step he takes to make someone completely disappear, including legal documents and a chronological order of events. The information shared in this book is based on real experiences with his actual clients, and is unlike any content ever released in his other books. The stories are all true, with the exception of changed names, locations, and minor details in order to protect the privacy of those described. For many, this is the only privacy manual needed to secure a new digital life.

An easy-to-follow guide that helps you remove traces of yourself online. Click the link to open the PDF workbook – https://inteltechniques.com/data/workbook.pdf

The Internet Privacy Handbook

SafeShepherd’s Handbook aims to give you a single source for the instructions you’ll need you remove your personal information from sites that expose your information.

We believe that your personal data should never be used against you. Privacy should be accessible, and right now it’s just too darn complicated. This Handbook aims to give you a single source for the instructions you’ll need you remove your personal information from sites that expose your information.

GET STARTED HERE

Compromised Information Database

Find out if your personal information has been released in a data breach.

Find out more at haveibeenpwned.com (yes, this is legit).

View & Download Your Facebook Data

THE FACEBOOK EXPERIMENT

For many, having your lives controlled and your devices and whereabouts constantly monitored is a horrifying reality. What if all those secrets shared in those private Facebook groups got out?

I decided to run a little experiment on Facebook and see what sort of information they stored about my activity. As a former victim of domestic violence myself, I wanted to see it from the perspective of whether or not an abuser who had gained access to my account could see the activity in the private groups for which I belonged and participated. How much could my abuser see? How much danger could I be in? I started by using these steps from a computer, not a mobile device (you can do this in your own account, but if you think your devices are being tracked, find a different device).

Click below to read the blog post and follow the step-by-step instructions to evaluate your own Facebook account.

Trapped In A Sharing Dilemma

How to Delete Your Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and TikTok (by Wired Magazine)

SOCIAL NETWORKS WALK a fine line between being a useful tool and a crippling addiction. They’re also fraught with critics, who say that they damage our personal privacy and can convey misinformation. Whether you want your free time back or don’t like your personal info scattered about on the internet, you may be considering deactivating some accounts.

Wanting to delete your account is one thing, but actually being able to hit the delete button is another story. Social media outlets make money off of you and your information, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that they don’t want to let you go. Because of this, the biggest networks have made it overly complicated to delete your account. But if you are set on getting rid of them, here’s what you’ll have to do.

Read the complete article here – https://www.wired.com/story/how-to-delete-your-facebook-instagram-twitter-snapchat/

Renaming Mobile Devices

Rename your Apple devices – CLICK HERE

Rename your Android devices – CLICK HERE

6 Ways to Delete Yourself From the Internet (Wired Magazine)

You’ll never be able to get a clean slate, but you can significantly downsize your digital footprint. Learn how to:

  • Opt out from data brokers
  • Get Google search results updated
  • Delete old online accounts
  • Clean up your digital history
  • “Go Nuclear”
  • Future protections

CLICK HERE to read the article (Make sure your device is safe to do so. Not sure? Try your local public library’s computers to do your important searches.)

Documentation Log (VictimsVoice - Legally Admissible Tool)

VictimsVoice screenshot iPhoneVictimsVoice Legally Admissible Tool

(CICK HERE to purchase a license of your own)
(CICK HERE to find a VictimsVoice Partner Member that can provide a free license)
(CICK HERE to donate a license to someone who may need one and can’t afford it)

VictimsVoice is a tool that fixes the legal documentation burdens victims face when recalling details for reporting acts of violence, abuse, and harassment. It is built to meet HIPAA, VAWA, VOCA, FVPSA, CCPA, and GDPR compliance, as well as the strict legal standards (Daubert Standard) of court admissibility, and provides the evidence needed for legal teams to successfully hold offenders accountable.

Documentation Log (SPARC - Paper-based)

Stalking Log Instructions

SPARC Paper-Based Log

(CICK HERE to access PDF file)

The stalking log should be used to record and document all stalking-related behavior. When reporting the incident, write down the person’s name and agency to whom you reported, including any badge or identification number they may have. If you make a report to someone, you can ask them to provide you with a copy of it for your records.

Important note: Since this information could potentially be introduced as evidence or inadvertently shared with the stalker at a future time, do not include any information in the log that you do not want the stalker to see.

Safety Planning Strategies

The guidance below is intended for general informational purposes only and is not designed to replace a personalized safety plan created with the assistance of a professional. The suggestions below are also not exhaustive. You are the expert on your own life and you know best what options might be possible or feasible.

CLICK HERE TO ACCESS THE RESOURCE

Step-by-Step How-to Guides (CETA)

The Clinic to End Tech Abuse (CETA)  provides a collection of materials, tools, and resources that we have created to help IPV survivors, support workers, and technologists discover and address tech-related risks. All of their resources are free to download and use. They use many of them as part of our Computer Security Clinic for IPV survivors in New York City. Their step-by-step how-to guides can be especially useful for providing help remotely.

CLICK HERE to access the resources.

Teen Dating Violence

On-Demand Videos

On-Demand Viewing ButtonLove Shouldn’t Hurt (2/8/2022)

An honest conversation about the signs of teen dating violence, what to do, and where to go for help.

This session dives into the reality of what signs parents and guardians can look for, how to approach the subject, and what resources can you seek if your loved one is in trouble.

It talk about ways to open up the dialogue with often resistant teens and young adults, for an honest look at relationships, what defines healthy, and how to set boundaries with so much peer pressure.

If you are a parent or guardian, a Middle School or High School teacher or guidance counselor, a community leader, or a victim advocate, you won’t want to miss this!

Tips on Talking about Healthy Relationships with Teens (Parents/Guardians)

Encourage open, honest, and thoughtful conversations, and listen without judgement. Talk openly with young teens about healthy relationships – not just the good parts, but what a healthy disagreement looks like too.

Allow them to articulate their values and expectations for healthy relationships. Encourage debate rather than telling them their ideas are “wrong.” This gives young people room to come to their own understanding.

Be sensitive and firm. Parenting a young teen is not easy—especially when it comes to helping them navigate their way through relationships, so be sure to be sensitive while being firm.

Be adaptive – much of what young people face today are different than what we experienced at that age.

Be willing to talk openly and respect differences of opinion, and know that some of the decisions you make will not be high on their popularity list.

Consistent behavior on your part as the adult goes a long way. Unexpected outbursts of frustration and/or anger is off-putting to anyone and does nothing to build confidence or trust.

Understand that adolescence is all about experimentation and often includes risk-taking – “normal teenage behavior” can appear anything-but-normal. Knowing what’s “normal” is critical to helping you better understand and guide young people. Taking risks and experimenting can be beneficial in some areas, so it’s our job as adults to help them identify what behaviors and actions are dangerous and harmful to themselves and others.

Pressure begins at an early age. Preteens and young teens face new and increasing pressures about sex, substance abuse and dating. Time and time again, young teens express their desire to have parents/role models take the time to listen to them and help them think through the situations they face – be that person!

Set clear expectations up front. Make sure young teens know how you feel about disrespect, use of abusive or inappropriate language, controlling behavior, or any forms of violence, and also be clear about your consequences for that type of behavior. If you talk about it before anything happens, it’s a conversation and not a reaction. It’s also about their behavior if and when you must hold them accountable.

Use TV episodes, movies, music lyrics, news, community events or the experiences of friends to have teachable moments and discuss healthy and unhealthy relationships.

Teach young people and model how to stand-up for friends when they observe unhealthy treatment of their peers.

If all you do is focus on what something “shouldn’t” look like, you won’t hold your audience for very long. Focus and teach what healthy relationships (friendships and romance) should look and feel like as well. Talk about healthy arguments and how to start a relationship with respectful boundaries.

Don’t just “pop in” when there’s an issue. Be an active participant in your young teen’s life. Explore ways to know more about your young teen’s friends and interests. Find activities you can do together, but also encourage healthy independence.

Be prepared to mess up. If you’ve done a good job at teaching that perfection is a myth and mistakes are a learning opportunity, the young person will be more apt to not hold it against you. Model the behavior you want to see.

Teen Dating Abuse In The Digital Age

Digitizing Abuse is an Urban Institute project studying the role of technology in teen dating abuse and harassment and in teen bullying. Knowing how many teens are affected and how they’ve been victimized can inform strategies to address this problem.

Click on the images below for a larger and readable version.

Digitizing Abuse stats infographic Digitizing Abuse stats infographic Digitizing Abuse stats infographic Digitizing Abuse stats infographic

KEY FINDINGS
  • 25 percent of dating teens report they’ve been digitally victimized by their partners. Only 9 percent seek help, and rarely from parents or teachers.
  • 84 percent of digital abuse victims said they were also psychologically abused.
  • 52 percent of digital abuse victims said they were also physically abused.
  • 33 percent of digital abuse victims said they were also sexually coerced.
  • One in six youth report being the victims of cyber bullying, which is abuse and harassment from someone other than a romantic partner.
  • 90 percent of cyber bullying victims said they were also psychologically abused.
  • Two-thirds to three-quarters of cyber bullying victims said they were also physically abused.
  • Victims of cyber bullying were almost three times as likely to also experience digital dating abuse or harassment.
  • LGBTQ youth reported much higher rates of digital dating abuse and cyber bullying than heterosexual youth.

Find out more at https://www.urban.org/features/teen-dating-abuse-digital-age

Documentation Log (VictimsVoice - Legally Admissible Tool)

VictimsVoice screenshot iPhoneVictimsVoice Legally Admissible Tool

(CICK HERE to purchase a license of your own)
(CICK HERE to find a VictimsVoice Partner Member that can provide a free license)
(CICK HERE to donate a license to someone who may need one and can’t afford it)

VictimsVoice is a tool that fixes the legal documentation burdens victims face when recalling details for reporting acts of violence, abuse, and harassment. It is built to meet HIPAA, VAWA, VOCA, FVPSA, CCPA, and GDPR compliance, as well as the strict legal standards (Daubert Standard) of court admissibility, and provides the evidence needed for legal teams to successfully hold offenders accountable.

Break The Cycle (Website)

The leading national nonprofit organization that provides preventive dating and domestic violence education and outreach to teens and young adults.

For more information, visit them online at https://breakthecycle.org/

Love Is Respect (Website)

Love is Respect logo

Resources For Young People To Prevent Unhealthy Relationships & Intimate Partner Violence. Contact Us 24/7 Via Text, Phone, Or Chat If You Have Questions About Your Relationship. Help for Friends & Family. Highly-Trained Advocates. Spanish Services.

Find out more at www.loveisrespect.org

When Dating Hurts (Book)

It’s what you need to know about dating violence. Told by a family that experienced the worst.

When Dating Hurts - Book CoverKRISTIN MITCHELL

“Our daughter was the same as yours until she became a dating violence victim.”
– Bill Mitchell

Board of Advisors with Clery Center for Security On Campus
Board of Advisors with Cabrini University’s Jordan Center for Children of ​Trauma and Domestic Violence Education

Buy The Book & Listen to The Podcast: https://www.whendatinghurts.com/

Self Care

On-Demand Videos

On-Demand Viewing ButtonEmotional First Aid Kit For A Bad Day (3/8/2022)

Tools To Handle All The Hard Things Life Throws At You

So you had a bad day. Instead of turning to habit cooping mechanism, this talk will give you hands on skills you can start using to manage a bad day and not fall victim to it. Learn how to stay in control when disaster strikes and wants to take you down.

By the end of this talk you will feel confident you know how to manage your emotions and outlook to get through any tough situation.

This is for anyone that wants to not feel like a victim to their bad day. Also helpful to anyone that stands alongside others when they are going through a hard day.

If you are a survivor, a victim advocate, a counselor, or a therapist, you won’t want to miss this!

Free 1:1 Coaching Session with Katherine

Sit with Katherine for an hour of 1:1 coaching. No obligation session.

CLICK HERE to book your date/time (Calendly).

Emotional First Aid Kit (Full Workshops)

Watch the full workshop in 5 segment videos, including:

  • Segment 1: You Had a Bad Day…
  • Segment 2: How to Overcome…
  • Segment 3: How to Resolve…
  • Segment 4: How to Breakdown…
  • Segment 5: How to Work Through…

CLICK HERE to access these workshop videos.

Documentation Log (VictimsVoice - Legally Admissible Tool)

VictimsVoice screenshot iPhoneVictimsVoice Legally Admissible Tool

(CICK HERE to purchase a license of your own)
(CICK HERE to find a VictimsVoice Partner Member that can provide a free license)
(CICK HERE to donate a license to someone who may need one and can’t afford it)

VictimsVoice is a tool that fixes the legal documentation burdens victims face when recalling details for reporting acts of violence, abuse, and harassment. It is built to meet HIPAA, VAWA, VOCA, FVPSA, CCPA, and GDPR compliance, as well as the strict legal standards (Daubert Standard) of court admissibility, and provides the evidence needed for legal teams to successfully hold offenders accountable.

PROFESSIONAL RESOURCES

Click the term below to go directly to that topic.

Domestic Violence in the Workplace

On-Demand Videos

On-Demand Viewing ButtonWhen Domestic Violence Impacts Your Workplace

Domestic violence clearly impacts the motivation, productivity, and morale of employees, and as business owners and leaders, there are things you can, should, and must do to support your team. This 50-minute workshop covered the following:

>  What should employers think about how domestic violence (DV) affects their workplace?
>  What laws are implicated in DV scenarios?
>  How does HIPAA confidentiality factor in?
>  How do you address remote working employees in areas of threats and vulnerabilities?
>  How do you keep your workplace safe?

Ayesha Hamilton, an employment law attorney in NJ, NY, and PA covered the legal obligations, as well as safety, security, training, and the morale of your entire team.


On-Demand Viewing ButtonThe Empathetic Workplace

No workplace is immune to trauma, from claims of harassment or bias to large-scale impacts like the pandemic. When we respond well to those in trauma, we build trust that yields increased productivity, engagement, satisfaction, and loyalty.

Katharine Manning, author of The Empathetic Workplace and an attorney with more than 25 years’ experience on issues of trauma and victimization, provided an understanding of the prevalence of trauma and its effect on both the person in trauma and those interacting with them, then gives practical advice on how to support those in trauma in the workplace while protecting yourself from compassion fatigue and not running afoul of legal obligations.

This 50-minute workshop covered how to gain the expertise to respond with calm and confidence to traumas at work, whenever and wherever they arise

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On-Demand Viewing ButtonThe Employed Domestic Violence Victim

Roughly three-quarters of domestic violence victims are employed outside the home, but the abuse they experience doesn’t always stay in the house when they leave for work.

This program examines the impact of domestic violence on employee victims and their co-workers and the employment laws that support them, as well as the variety of ways an employer can help.

Participants will learn about the sabotage and “spillover” tactics of abusers, review provisions that protect a victim’s job and confidentiality, and discover an assortment of safety strategies that can save the lives of abused employees and their co-workers.

MD Earned Sick and Safe Leave Employee Notice (Maryland)

The Maryland Healthy Working Families Act requires employers with 15 or more employees to provide paid sick and safe leave for certain employees. It also requires that employers who employ 14 or fewer employees provide unpaid sick and safe leave for certain employees.
For more information, visit https://www.dllr.state.md.us/paidleave/paidleaveposter.shtml

NJ SAFE Act (New Jersey)

The New Jersey Security and Financial Empowerment (“SAFE”) Act provides leave for employees who are victims of domestic violence or sexual assault or have a family member who is a victim. The amendment also expands the definition of “family member” under the SAFE Act to mirror the definition under the NJFLA.

For more information, visit https://www.nj.gov/labor/forms_pdfs/lwdhome/AD-289_9-13.pdf

Desktop One-Sheet Resource for HR

Blackbird Resource coverDownload your complimentary copy of The One Page You Need on Your Desk if You Work with People.
It’s packed with quick references to get the people you work with to the right resources quickly.
CLICK HERE

Sample Work-Related Domestic Violence Policies

National Center on Domestic and Sexual Violence

This 15-page word document can be used as a guide to building out your own workplace policy. Always consult your attorney when drafting formal policies to ensure it meets local, state, and federal guidelines, laws, and regulations. ACCESS HERE

Cornell Law School

Domestic Violence and the Workplace Model Policy and Toolkit
Editable versions of the Domestic Violence and the Workplace Policy and Toolkit, including a Model Policy (.doc) and Toolkit (.ppt). ACCESS HERE

Workplaces Respond to Domestic and Sexual Violence: A National Resource Center

Model Workplace Policy on Domestic Violence, Sexual Violence, and Stalking
Clear guidelines help employers appropriately respond to domestic violence, sexual violence, and stalking impacting the workplace, and promote a workplace culture of prevention and support. ACCESS HERE

Reading Materials (Books)

The Empathetic Workplace Book

THE EMPATHETIC WORKPLACE
5 Steps to a Compassionate, Calm, and Confident Response to Trauma on The Job

– Katharine Manning

THE STEP-BY-STEP LASER METHOD TO ADDRESS WORKPLACE TRAUMA
You shouldn’t just prepare for reports of trauma in the workplace. You should plan for it.

The Empathetic Workplace provides practical advice to help those who work with humans respond to issues that are uniquely human.

Find a bookseller and listen to an audio clip on the web at http://www.katharinemanning.com/my-book/

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Stop Signs BookSTOP SIGNS
Recognizing, Avoiding, and Escaping Abusive Relationships
Lynn Fairweather

Most abusers display warning signs that intelligent women miss—mostly because the majority of women have not been trained to recognize them. In this groundbreaking book, Lynn Fairweather—an expert in the field of intimate partner violence response and prevention—provides women with the information they need to recognize dangerous men before they become victims of abuse.

Find a bookseller online – https://presagetraining.com/about-the-book/

Stalking

On-Demand Videos

On-Demand Viewing ButtonThe Threat Is Inside The House

Friends and family ask for assistance installing WiFi or configuring smart devices in the house. They are now asking for help ‘fixing my situation.’

The very same Internet of Things (IoT) which are installed for convenience can form a gilded, velvet-lined cage with an Alexa or Siri voice.

We will discuss how the community can apply information security (InfoSec) principles and scientific (forensic) principles to assist domestic abuse victims in cutting the electronic cord to their abuser. The counterintelligence mindset should be applied to the domestic situation- what can be gathered, what sources and methods can be used against a person in their own house, and how to detect the threat.

The talk will discuss the use of social media to detect physical surveillance, technical countermeasures for surveillance devices, lessons learned with forensics…and the ways to protect oneself against leaving data behind.


On-Demand Viewing ButtonFollowing The Digital Breadcrumbs

Identifying, Preserving, and Presenting Digital Evidence of Stalking and other Crimes

As technology becomes more integral to our lives, offenders have increasingly used – and misused – technology to facilitate stalking and other criminal activity. Stalking is a prevalent, dangerous, and often misunderstood crime that often intersects with intimate partner violence. It is imperative that digital evidence is identified, preserved, and presented to demonstrate how offenders assert power and control as well as how they locate, surveil, and monitor their victims.

This presentation will demonstrate how digital platforms can contain evidence of stalking, intimate partner violence, nonconsensual distribution of intimate images, and other related crimes. The presenters will demonstrate common technology misused by offenders, provide strategies for preserving digital evidence, and discuss theories of admission.

Operation Safe Escape: Training & Resources

Operation: SafeEscape Logo

We fight against domestic violence in three ways. First is by empowering the individuals impacted by domestic violence, helping them (and their children) turn from victims to survivors. We help to develop secure communication channels with their support system and local shelters, and then build on that to provide security and safety guidance relevant to their current step in the process.

Next, we make sure that the survivor has a safe place to go. To do this, we work with shelters, safe houses, support systems, social services, and advocacy groups in developing security solutions and training staff on counter-surveillance, physical security, cybersecurity, and other security concepts. The goal is to make sure all heroes fighting against domestic violence are safe.

Finally, we work with law enforcement to help provide resources and address any training gaps related to the technical aspects of abuse, stalking, harassment, and other crimes. We work with officers all over the country to help them understand the challenges that victims of domestic violence (and increasingly often, human trafficking) face even after the abuser has been removed from the home. We’re in the process of capturing some of these lessons learned in a formal training program.

Naturally, everything we do is free. We don’t charge individuals–not even shipping costs when we send them resources and tools. We don’t charge organizations for when we help them improve their security posture or stand up a formal program. We don’t charge departments or agencies for consulting and training. We only have one goal: to make sure everyone can feel safe.

Find out more at https://safeescape.org/

Stalking and Harassment Assessment and Risk Profile (SHARP)

The Stalking and Harassment Assessment and Risk Profile (SHARP) is a 43 item web-based assessment developed from the empirical research, clinical literature, stories from stalking victims, case studies, as well as feedback from victims, advocates, and other professionals in the field. SHARP provides an assessment of the “big picture” of the stalking situation.

CLICK HERE TO ACCESS THE TOOL

A Checklist for Law Enforcement Response to Stalking

The First Responders Guide to Stalking was created by the Department of Justice and the Stop Violence Against Women Grants Technical Assistance Project. This Checklist for Law Enforcement Response to Stalking provides guidance for law enforcement to enforce the law and thoroughly investigate stalking cases while being sensitive to the needs of victims. By using this Checklist, dispatchers and responding and investigating officers, as well as supervisors and agency policy-makers, can assess their response to stalking cases—both as individuals and as an entire agency. Fully implementing the Checklist’s practices will provide tools so law enforcement can safely and sensitively intervene to protect victims; hold offenders accountable for their violent, coercive actions; and reduce the likelihood of additional harm to or re-victimization of stalking survivors.

CLICK HERE TO ACCESS THE RESOURCE

Documentation Log (VictimsVoice - Legally Admissible Tool)

VictimsVoice screenshot iPhoneVictimsVoice Legally Admissible Tool

(CICK HERE to request information about becoming a VictimsVoice Partner Member)

When your clients’ need to document each incident of abuse, there’s a tool that you can help them access. VictimsVoice helps survivors become more willing and credible witnesses by making sure they collect the RIGHT evidence in the RIGHT way so investigators can build a better case and prosecutors can more effectively and appropriately hold abusers accountable.

VictimsVoice is a tool that fixes the legal documentation burdens victims face when recalling details for reporting acts of violence, abuse, and harassment. It is built to meet HIPAA, VAWA, VOCA, FVPSA, CCPA, and GDPR compliance, as well as the strict legal standards (Daubert Standard) of court admissibility, and provides the evidence needed for legal teams to successfully hold offenders accountable.

Safety Planning Strategies

The guidance below is intended for general informational purposes only and is not designed to replace a personalized safety plan created with the assistance of a professional. The suggestions below are also not exhaustive. You are the expert on your own life and you know best what options might be possible or feasible.

CLICK HERE TO ACCESS THE RESOURCE

Stalking Response Checklist for DV/SA Organizations

A checklist to help assess your agency’s response to stalking.

CLICK HERE TO ACCESS THE RESOURCE

Training Modules for Public Awareness (SPARC)

Scripted workshops and guidance for community educators, including You discussion guides.

CLICK HERE TO ACCESS THE RESOURCE

Brochures and Posters Request (SPARC)

Print “Understanding Stalking” Brochures and Posters Available to Order for Free (brochures in English and Spanish).

CLICK HERE TO ACCESS THE ORDER FORM

For More on the Use of Technology to Stalk

IACP Cyber Security Center
Information and guidance for law enforcement investigating crimes that use technology

Search.org
A resource for law enforcement to find the appropriate portals and contacts for subpoenas etc.

Training and/or Assistance (SPARC, AEquitas)

AEquitas
24/7 technical assistance for prosecutors

SPARC Training Request Form
We are funded to provide training to all current and potential OVW grantees. We are happy to provide additional training for specialized disciplines.

AEquitas Additional Resources

Confronting Racial Bias Against Black and African American Victims in the Prosecution of Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Stalking, and Human Trafficking – Article  |  Recorded panel discussion

Safeguarding Victim Privacy in a Digital World: Ethical Considerations for Prosecutors – Webinar

The Internet & Intimate Partner Violence: Technology Changes, Abuse Doesn’t – Article

Prosecuting Image Exploitation – Article

Stop Calling It ‘Revenge Porn’: Prosecuting Image Exploitation – Webinar

Step-by-Step How-to Guides (CETA)

The Clinic to End Tech Abuse (CETA)  provides a collection of materials, tools, and resources that we have created to help IPV survivors, support workers, and technologists discover and address tech-related risks. All of their resources are free to download and use. They use many of them as part of our Computer Security Clinic for IPV survivors in New York City. Their step-by-step how-to guides can be especially useful for providing help remotely.

CLICK HERE to access the resources.

Teen Dating Violence

On-Demand Videos

On-Demand Viewing ButtonLove Shouldn’t Hurt (2/8/2022)

An honest conversation about the signs of teen dating violence, what to do, and where to go for help.

This session dives into the reality of what signs parents and guardians can look for, how to approach the subject, and what resources can you seek if your loved one is in trouble.

It talk about ways to open up the dialogue with often resistant teens and young adults, for an honest look at relationships, what defines healthy, and how to set boundaries with so much peer pressure.

If you are a parent or guardian, a Middle School or High School teacher or guidance counselor, a community leader, or a victim advocate, you won’t want to miss this!

Educators: Take A Stand FOR Healthy Relationships Curriculum (NCADV)

NCADV logo

NCADV’s Take A Stand For Healthy Relationships Curriculum

We hope you find their materials useful in your discussions with teens regarding healthy relationships and teen dating violence. Because this is a sensitive topic, we recommend that you take a few minutes to read the following critical resources. These are designed to help you so that you are as prepared as possible to provide safe assistance, support, and help students, whether they are experiencing abuse, witnessing abuse at home, or wanting to help a friend or family member.

If you know of a teen in immediate need of help, contact the teen dating violence hotline at: 1-866-331-9474

CLICK HERE TO GET STARTED

Educators: Develop Bully Prevention Efforts

As an educator, you play a central role in creating an environment that is safe, supportive, engaging, and helpfully challenging for all students. A comprehensive—individual, small group, school-wide and school-community wide—effort to prevent bully-victim behavior and promote ally behavior is a foundation to achieving this goal. Check out our Educator page to access the best practices guide on Comprehensive Bully Prevention and Pro-Allyship Efforts.

Learn more at https://schoolclimate.org/resources-for-educators/

Download Educator Resources here: CLICK HERE for PDF DOWNLOAD

Teen Dating Abuse In The Digital Age

Digitizing Abuse is an Urban Institute project studying the role of technology in teen dating abuse and harassment and in teen bullying. Knowing how many teens are affected and how they’ve been victimized can inform strategies to address this problem.

Click on the images below for a larger and readable version.

Digitizing Abuse stats infographic Digitizing Abuse stats infographic Digitizing Abuse stats infographic Digitizing Abuse stats infographic

KEY FINDINGS
  • 25 percent of dating teens report they’ve been digitally victimized by their partners. Only 9 percent seek help, and rarely from parents or teachers.
  • 84 percent of digital abuse victims said they were also psychologically abused.
  • 52 percent of digital abuse victims said they were also physically abused.
  • 33 percent of digital abuse victims said they were also sexually coerced.
  • One in six youth report being the victims of cyber bullying, which is abuse and harassment from someone other than a romantic partner.
  • 90 percent of cyber bullying victims said they were also psychologically abused.
  • Two-thirds to three-quarters of cyber bullying victims said they were also physically abused.
  • Victims of cyber bullying were almost three times as likely to also experience digital dating abuse or harassment.
  • LGBTQ youth reported much higher rates of digital dating abuse and cyber bullying than heterosexual youth.

Find out more at https://www.urban.org/features/teen-dating-abuse-digital-age

Men Can Stop Rape Youth Development Programs

Men Can Stop Rape

Direct service through youth development programs is a cornerstone of Men Can Stop Rape’s work.

Drawing on our 24+ years of mobilizing boys and men to end violence against women through healthy masculinity, our trainings aim to help communities produce sustainable, measurable outcomes at each level of the environmental change model, emphasizing primary prevention, social and emotional learning, and healthy masculinity.

Using a train-the-trainer model, our approach has strengthened the skills of more than 12,000 trainers, maximized program and product delivery in more than 300 organizations, and conducted workshops for more than 50,000 people in urban, rural, suburban and frontier communities. Agencies, schools, organizations and institutions that we have trained include: K-12 professionals, university faculty, staff and students, youth-serving organizations, law enforcement and the US armed forces, professional sports leagues, college athletics, LGBTQ-serving organizations, state and local coalitions, fatherhood groups, juvenile justice organizations, correctional facilities, social workers, counselors, service agencies, and government agencies.

Find out more at https://mcsr.org/youth-development

Teen Dating Abuse - Brief Guide: What Service Providers and Educators Need to Know (NIJ Resource)

Date Published: 2020
Length: 12 pages

Annotation
This guide from the Violence Against Women Research Consortium instructs service providers and educators in what they should know about teen dating abuse.

(CLICK HERE to DOWNLOAD PDF)

As per the NIJ: National Institute of Justice

The guide first defines “teen dating abuse” (TDA) as ”a pattern of controlling, abusive, or aggressive behavior towards a current or former dating partner, either in person or using social media or texting.”

Regarding its prevalence:

    • One in three teens experience some form of dating abuse.
    • Teens who experience online abusive harassment or threats are also likely to be experiencing offline abuse.
    • Only 33 percent of TDA victims tell someone about the dating abuse, with most of these telling a friend.
    • Eighty-one percent of parents either do not believe TDA is an issue or acknowledge they do not know whether it is.
    • Those most at risk for TDA victimization are girls, people of color, and LGBTQ teens;
      • however, each victim is distinctive in responding to and experiencing needs related to their victimization.

Still, this guide outlines some of the common signals that a person may be experiencing TDA. These include behavioral changes, such as:

    • inconsistent school attendance
    • new problem behaviors
    • request to change class or lunch hour
    • unexplained injuries.

Other major sections of the guide address:

    • how to be an adult ally for a teen experiencing abuse
    • “Some Do’s and Don’ts” in constructive interactions with TDA victims
    • helpful questions to ask a person who may be experiencing TDA
    • the development of a safety plan for victims of TDA.

Included in the PDF is 1 national resource and 7 resources specific to Arizona.

(CLICK HERE to DOWNLOAD PDF)

Literature Review: A Product of the Model Programs Guide (OJJDP Resource)

As per the OJJDP: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention:

This literature review will discuss research surrounding teen dating violence, including definitions of different types of dating violence, the scope of the problem, risk and protective factors related to perpetration and victimization, short- and long-term consequences, and outcome evidence of programs that seek to prevent or reduce the occurrence of teen dating violence.

This review focuses on dating violence that occurs between adolescents in middle and high school (primarily youth ages 12 to 18). The terms teens, youths, and adolescents are used interchangeably throughout the review.

VISIT THE LITERATURE

Sections include:

  • Definitions
  • Scope of the Problem
  • Risk Factors for Teen Dating Violence
  • Protective Factors Against Teen Dating Violence
  • Consequences of Teen Dating Violence
  • Outcome Evidence
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • About This Literature Review

Break The Cycle (Website)

The leading national nonprofit organization that provides preventive dating and domestic violence education and outreach to teens and young adults.

For more information, visit them online at https://breakthecycle.org/

Love Is Respect (Website)

Love is Respect logo

Resources For Young People To Prevent Unhealthy Relationships & Intimate Partner Violence. Contact Us 24/7 Via Text, Phone, Or Chat If You Have Questions About Your Relationship. Help for Friends & Family. Highly-Trained Advocates. Spanish Services.

Find out more at www.loveisrespect.org

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